FAQs

All of your OSPREY Camp questions answered here!
  • Why is the program called OSPREY camp?
  • How did our school become involved in OSPREY Camp?
  • What is the camp like?
  • Who will supervise the students?
  • How are high school students selected?
  • What happens if my child gets sick?
  • My child takes daily medication, how will this be handled?
  • What kind of clothing should we pack?
  • What food should I send?
  • What does “kosher” mean?
  • Can we visit the camp?
  • Is there paperwork we need to complete?
Why is the program called OSPREY camp?
The acronym stands for “Opportunities for Students Promoting Respect for the Environment and Youth.” We want students to have the opportunity to not only learn about our natural world, but to take action to use our natural resources responsibly, becoming stewards of our natural environment.
How did our school become involved in OSPREY Camp?
For years (decades) your school may have participated in the outdoor education program previously located at Camp Thunderbird and Camp Waskowitz. The program you will participate in will be very similar to the one previous students participated in, it’s just in a different place. In fact, many of the staff are the same as at Camp Thunderbird and Camp Waskowitz!
What is the camp like?
Schechter is a 180-acre private nonprofit camp. With a private lake, river access, forest and bog the camp provides a lush outdoor classroom. The heated cabins sleep 12 and have electricity and running water, and bathrooms and showers are attached. All food is provided by the camp and is kosher and nut-free. Buildings provide space for classes in case of inclement weather, but the program is designed to get students outside.
Who will supervise the students?
During class time teachers are with their classes. When students are not with their class, trained high school students provide direct supervision to the students in a ratio of 2 high school students to 10 elementary school students. The high school students are supported by the adult OSPREY Camp staff, as well as the classroom teachers.
How are high school students selected?
The high school students are recruited through the local high school. They complete an application, which includes a recommendation from a high school faculty member. Once the applications are reviewed, students are selected to attend training. Following the intense training weekend, students receive a recommendation from their trainer. If the student does not receive a positive recommendation, they do not attend camp. Following training, a background check is run on the students and they, again, must receive a positive background check. High school students continue to receive training and guidance while on site from teachers and camp staff.
What happens if my child gets sick?
First aid trained staff will be the first contact with students who are ill or injured. If further medical attention is necessary, you will be contacted and consulted for further treatment. The camp is 911 accessible, and full medical facilities are within minutes of the camp.
My child takes daily medication, how will this be handled?
You will need to turn all medications in to your child’s teacher, along with doctor’s orders and signature for dispensing. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medications. Talk with your child’s teacher to obtain the proper paperwork and turn in medication in the original container (no baggies).
What kind of clothing should we pack?
Students should bring sturdy walking shoes (hiking boots are not necessary); no sandals or flip flops; an extra pair of shoes is a good idea in case of rain. Sturdy outdoor clothing is advisable: jeans, t-shirts, raincoat, sweatshirts, etc. Be prepared to be in the outdoors in the Pacific Northwest in the springtime. Due to the plant growth in the spring, students are not allowed to wear shorts.
What food should I send?
Due to the kosher considerations of the camp, no outside food is tolerated. All meals will be provided by the camp.
What does “kosher” mean?
Kosher refers to foods and cooking processes in keeping with the Jewish dietary laws. Since the kitchen must be certified kosher to facilitate the camp’s Jewish programming, we respect that certification and honor their beliefs. These dietary laws include no pork or shellfish and no dairy is served with meat. The food is good, plentiful and healthy!
Can we visit the camp?
On occasion, there is an “open house” when you can visit the camp. Directions and reminders will be sent home with your child when one is scheduled.
Is there paperwork we need to complete?
Registration and medical information, along with packing suggestions, will be sent home with your child a couple of months before camp. If you have questions regarding your child, ask their classroom teacher. If other resources are needed to accommodate your child’s needs, the teacher will know who to access.